Archives: Reading

How to Raise Smart Kids

……. by making the kids use First Veritas Smart Kids Series, of course! What were you expecting to read? 😀

Smart kids are built. A common thread that runs through all child prodigies is the amount of time that they spent immersed in their studies or skills.

There are few things as exciting as listening to a parent brag about how smart their child is. The excitement. The feeling of pride. Every parent wants their kids to grow up smart. To this end,  we at  First Veritas have a few books to help your Nursery age child grow smart and make you proud.

They are:

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Smart Kids Mathematics for Nursery Book 1 and Book 2

  • Mathematical concept are explained in an activity based manner
  • Designed to make learning enjoyable for children
  • Illustrations are colourful and stimulating

 

Smart Kids English for Nursery Book 1 and Book 2

  • Specially and professionally written to satisfy the requirement of the curriculum for kindergarten
  • Designed with plenty of activities and colourful illustrations to sustain children interest in language learning.
  • Help to develop the foundational skills required by children

 

Smart Kids Alphabet Colouring and Activity book

  • An activity based book with colourful illustrations
  • Easy to use and understand
  • Developmentally appropriate for the language acquisition of the child

 

Smart Kids Environmental Studies for Nursery (Books 1 & 2)

  • Activity based and designed to make learning easy and enjoyable for children
  • Illustrations are colourful and stimulating

 

Smart Kids Handwriting for Nursery (Books 1 &2)

  • Contain basic developmental writing skills
  • Teach the different stages in the learning of writing, words formation & simple sentences.
  • The child develops motor skills and co-ordination of hand and eye movement when using the books.
  • The content of the books are centred around various activities for young minds
  • Illustrations in the books are very attractive and colourful Revision chapters are evident in the books

 

Get in touch with us today for any of the above books for your children or your school. Call 08104039756

What Storybooks Did You Read As A Youngster?

The years roll by and times change. As a youngster, you likely read certain storybooks as part of your upbringing. Most likely, in your earliest reading years, you read quite a number of fairy tales like, “Jack And The Bean Stalk”, “Cinderella”, “Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs”, “Beauty And The Beast”, among numerous others. Local titles like “Akin Goes To School”, and “Eze Goes To School” might also have featured in your library at some point.

 

Perhaps as you grew towards and around your teenage years, you also picked series like “The Famous Five”, “Secret Seven” and other adventure stories like that. From the local Nigerian scene, you probably read “Things Fall Apart”, a title that was prominently circulated and even made into a television series.

 

It really doesn’t matter what titles you read. After all, there are millions of beautifully written story books out there. Well written storybooks are vital for developing good comprehension skills, as well as the development of a sound vocabulary. Since there is no end to knowledge acquisition and development, we hope that you are still reading even now in adulthood. Take moments off work and play to pick up a good work of fiction to read. Good books are just as mentally stimulating for adults as they are for children.

Since we are in a world advocating for people to read more, pick up one or more of our Graded Readers Story books for your little one. We have over 36 titles in that series.

Graded Readers Book

Graded Readers Book

 

Still, we would love to hear from you. Do tell us what story books you read as a youngster.

For School Admin: Leveraging During This Ebola Period

As a school administrator/owner, how are you adjusting your academic calendar plan in view of the holiday extension due to the outbreak of the Ebola virus (EVD)?

Holiday extension due to health concerns should not totally disrupt the school’s teaching plans. As such, if you are a futuristic school with an already vibrant e-learning platform, kudos to you! However, if you do not have existing e-learning platforms, here are a few tips you can use before school resumes:

  • Assign revision assignments and communicate them via bulk SMS to the parents of your students (See why you should keep school records?)
  • Mathematics and English (and all their variations) are the bases on which others course subjects are built. Therefore, start students on course work in Mathematics & English
    Graded Readers Book

    Graded Readers Book

    before school resumption. Encourage their parents to come to the school to purchase relevant textbooks.Below are some of the textbooks you can utilize:

    • First Veritas Grammar and Comprehension for Primary Schools (Books 1-5)
    •  The Book of Phonics for Primary Schools (with complimentary Audio CD) (Books 1-6)
    • First Veritas Quantitative Reasoning for Primary Schools (Books 1-6)
    • First Veritas Verbal Reasoning for Primary Schools (Books 1-6)
    • First Veritas has Universal Basic Mathematics for Primary 1-6
    •  First Veritas Graded Readers for Primary is a series of 36 storybooks across 6 levels. Give them essay assignments based on these story books. Engage the students!
    • For the pre-primary schoolers, our Pinwheel Books can be very beneficial. Pinwheel Jumbo Activity
      Jumbo Activity Book

      Jumbo Activity Book

      Book is a wholistic  activity book to engage the mind of the very active pre-schooler.

    • First Veritas Question Bank is a CD compilation of WAEC past questions (over 20 years) in 11 subjects. Students can practice with this software in the comfort of their homes before school resumption and even after school resumption.

This is a very challenging period for the education sector but it could also be an occasion for you to differentiate your school as a creative, practical and pro-active institution by taking these necessary steps.

You can call 08104039756 to order for some or all of these books.

Is It True That Nigerians Do Not Read?

Image from Google

Image from Google

There is the constant complaint that Nigerians do not read. We hear about the death of the reading culture in the country over and over again. In truth, if we look at book sales records, it does seem that those assertions are correct. However, a closer look may reveal something else.

 

Because of the often lack of statistics available in the country, in the past, it was difficult to measure a lot of things, including book and magazine sales. With the advent of the internet though, for the first time, we have a means of collating data for evaluation. Here are a few teasers.

 

  • “Nigerians do not read”, yet there are 56 million active mobile internet users in the country.
  • As at 2013, Nigeria had overtaken South Africa to become Facebook’s largest user base in Sub Saharan Africa with over 11 million users.
  • Nigeria is the third most active African country on Twitter.
  • Nigeria has been in the top 10 usage of Opera Mini browser globally for many years.
  • Nigeria continues to be a top country on the BBC website in terms of traffic.

 

There are many more places online that Nigerians are active, but a look at these few should suffice for our experiment. If it is true that Nigerians do not read, exactly what is it that Nigerians on Facebook and Twitter do? Sleep? Mope?

 

Every day on Facebook and Twitter , Nigerians share and comment on articles that they have read. Interesting (and sometimes sadly unpleasant) discussions are generated from these articles. The records show that Nigerians put out a lot of information on those two platforms. We see people publishing their own notes, as well as sharing excerpts and links from their own blogs and websites.

 

Perhaps it isn’t true after all that Nigerians do not read. Perhaps the real challenge is that authors and publishers need to find out how to create content that Nigerians will enjoy reading.

First Veritas Question Bank: WAEC past questions with answers

Anyone who has ever sat for an examination and had access to past questions and answers of same exams in the years before knows the value of such material. For one, past questions and answers help students have a fair idea of what to expect and how to deal with those challenges.  Not only do those issues include question types and formats, but also how best to manage time while taking the examination in question. As such, it is important also to be sure of the source of the past resources that one uses.

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Here are a few quick benefits of past question and answer tools:

 

–        they help you find out what you already know and what you don’t know

–        they help you practice time management in the exam hall

–        they help you get a better understanding of the exam topics

 

First Veritas has an electronic product, Question Bank, a student examination self-preparation tool

which provides past questions and answers to WAEC examinations over the past 20 years. The team at First Veritas actually have high profile experience of twenty years in the publishing field, making the brand a trustworthy one.

 

Question Bank is an electronic resource – installable on your Windows PC. It provides:

 

–        revision tests, practice tests, and exams

–        study tips

–        you can select different subjects, exam years, and time frames for each test you want to take in Question Bank

–        the Question Bank itself has a built-in usage guide

–        being electronic, wear and tear that traditional paper resources are subject to is eliminated

 

Question Bank is a great support tool to prepare for WAEC in the 21st century. Your children are able to use the tool they are already familiar with – the PC or laptop – to polish up their preparation. It does not replace the need for the student to study. Every student preparing for any exam has to have a fair grasp of the subjects being covered in order to get the best out of past questions and answers. Any student who has done that will benefit immensely from using First Veritas’ Question Bank.

 

For any enquiries, please call 08104039756.

LEARNING SHOULD BE FUN

As adults, we may have been conditioned to believe that education and a serious face are inseparable. After all, learning how to get serious is a key part of growing up; right? Or so we are told. Yet, it has been proven again and again that the more fun even adults have at something, the easier they are likely to find doing it and the better they are likely to become at it. If that applies to adults, perhaps we need to review how we teach children and young adults.

Learning can be fun. Learning should be fun. We need a paradigm change. That someone is having fun at something shouldn’t mean that they are not learning or that they are unserious about their studies or work. Many people went through school without any inkling that learning does not have to be drudgery and uninteresting. For most, schooling was painful and something that they couldn’t wait to get away from. But if we make learning fun, there is no reason why anyone should want to run away from it.

  • The teacher ought to have fun teaching. How effective can a teacher, trainer or instructor be if they do not enjoy what they do? Do we really want to entrust the training of our children to people who do not enjoy teaching them?
  • The pupils and students ought to have fun learning. When they find their studies and classrooms fun, we will hardly ever have to chase them around and be able to spend our energies to more productive tasks and experiences. They will read and learn of their own accord more than ever.
  • At every tier of the educational system should be an air of fun. From the policy makers to administrators, the idea of learning being fun should be imprinted from the very start or else it won’t work.

Usually, we reserve learning as fun (or is it fun as learning now) for nursery and pre-school children. We expect that after that, learning should be sober and serious. While there is some sense in which that is true, what happens usually is that we squeeze out all the fun from that point on. A grave mistake. Make leaning fun and watch as more knowledge goes round.

COMPREHENSION- DICTATES PASS OR FAIL

New PictureComprehension is the ability to understand and interprete what is being read. It is an important skill in the educational process. Why do we say so? Many of the challenges and problems that students are required to solve in life require a good deal of comprehension. If a child is unable to understand a question, how will he or she provide an accurate answer?

Problem solving often requires:

  • understanding the question or what has been stated is the problem
  • being able to connect the question or problem with other knowledge already acquired
  • being able to critically work out the solution

Have you ever made a statement or asked a question, and someone provides a response that does not fit in? In all probability, that individual did not understand the question. There was a problem comprehending your question or statement.

Failure does not always arise from a lack of knowledge or skill in the specific subject, but from poor comprehension skills. Some students fail physics not because they do not understand physics, but because they lack comprehension skills. Same goes for other subjects. Years later, as adults, they will require this same comprehension in whatever field they may embrace as a vocation.

This is why we must not only teach English as a language, but also promote a reading culture. Note that by reading culture, we include the use of dictionaries and other reference material.

Here are a few pointers:

  • we must make our children read and ask questions for the purpose of developing comprehension skills
  • materials to read: good story books and novels (both fiction and non-fiction); newspapers (though some of these have fallen behind in recent times); and magazines
  • a good dictionary should be available to children
  • if internet access is available and the child’s use can be monitored, a Google search for unknown words and phrases yields useful results

Growing up in the seventies and eighties, children had fewer distractions to reading. Today, the distractions are legion, yet we must polish the minds of our young ones by exposing them to well written books and periodicals.

5 BENEFITS OF READING FICTION

bedtimestories_1356045cFictional works may contain made up characters and experiences, but that does not mean that they serve purely entertainment purposes. Whether for adults or children, reading fictional stories is beneficial in a number of ways. Today, we share with you some of the benefits of reading fiction. Grab some popcorn and a bottle of Coke please 🙂

Entertainment

This is perhaps the most obvious benefit of fiction. People read fiction for the entertainment, the thrill and the pleasure they derive from the story lines.

Relaxation

This may sound closely related to entertainment, but it is not quite the same. Reading a novel or story book helps the mind and body to relax. Those who appreciate the rhythm of language often find reading a book a very calming and relaxing experience.

Of all the activities available to children in particular, book reading is perhaps the most calming. It is no wonder that bedtimes are perfect times to read a story to a child. As an adult, you should give it a try too. You just might be surprised.

Development of vocabulary

If you want to add new words to your vocabulary so you can better express yourself, reading fictional works is a good way to go about it. They expose you to experiences outside of your everyday reality, thereby introducing new words that you would otherwise not have come across.

Stimulates imagination

A fictional work can take you vividly through an evening on the streets of Paris, or on a detailed trip around the Caribbean. While you may never have been to these places, a good novel or story book paints a clear picture in your mind by stimulating your imagination. An active imagination can be a great asset to you in learning, as well as in problem solving.

Now, you have a few reasons to pick up a book to read today, and to encourage your children to read too. Act on it. 1st Veritas has a number of good fictional works that your children and pupils will find engaging. You should check those out too.

Do be sure to have a nice day!

WHY SLEEP IS IMPORTANT TO LEARNING

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It is great to have a desire to learn, and to dive into it whole-heartedly. It is good that we keep engaging our children, wards and students in better ways and with better tools for learning. Here are a few facts about the relationship between sleep and learning:

  • sleep is important to the growth and proper development of not just the body but the mind
  • sleep affects our co-ordination, and sleep-deprived people tend to be clumsier
  • sleep affects our ability to concentrate
  • sleep affects our ability to remember details

In summary, sleep is essential to the proper growth and development of the body as a whole – including the mind and our nervous system. This makes it an important factor in learning.

Depending on age, different people have different minimum sleep requirements necessary for healthy development and optimum performance.

  • Children between the ages of 5 and 11 need 10-11 hours of sleep a night
  • Children between the ages of 11 and 18 need 8.5-10 hours of sleep a night
  • Adults of 18 and above need at least 8 hours of sleep every night

The above age ranges and figures are not hard-coded but recommendations. We live in an age in which getting the minimum recommended amount of sleep gets to be underrated as something that is for weaklings and lazy people. Yet, it has been proven that the quality and quantity of sleep that we get are directly related to our mental sharpness, which directly impacts our ability to absorb and process information, as well as develop new skills.

Sleep matters.

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNT ON YOUR OWN RECENTLY?

Educational institutions and teachers are important and play a vital role in learning in every society. Yet, it has been proven that personal interest plays a very strong role in the learning process that life is. And if there is anything that personal interest does, it is that it motivates us to find out things on our own. It drives us into curiosity. It causes us to pursue knowledge.

It has been said that pursuit is the proof of desire. In other words, if something really interests you and you really want it, you will go after it.

Before this age, if you needed to learn by yourself, you had to visit a library every day, looking through the available book titles to sift which one has what you needed, then sit down for long hours day after day gleaning as much as you can from the titles you eventually selected. Sometimes, you had to repeat the process again and again till you found what you wanted. Today, technology has made it easier to learn by yourself.

Here are a few pointers:

  • using Google or other search engines, you can find out quick and dirty articles to break down any subject to you at whatever level of understanding you are – beginner, moderate or expert levels.
  • You can enrol online for a variety of online courses that allow you to learn from anywhere you are and at your own pace and in your own time.
  • Again, with the use of any search engine, you can find book titles that fit your learning needs in a matter of hours and you can order them right there online and have them delivered to you where you are

Learning has gotten a lot easier than it used to be. Now, even in situations where you have the benefit of a teacher, you can easily augment what you are learning from your instructor and become a much better equipped person.

So, here is the question: What have you learnt on your own recently?