Archives: teaching

Teaching Children How To Be Tidy

 “Tidiness” means “being orderly and clean in appearance” and “keeping things clean and in order”. Forget whatever else you have heard, but nobody likes dirty kids. As a parent, it is paramount that you teach your children how to be clean, tidy and presentable always and as early on in their lives as possible. It helps them grow into stable young men and women. Apart from its health benefits, it is a good social habit. These are some ways to instill tidiness in your child:

1) Start Early. The earlier the better. Start teaching your five year old responsibility and neatness by making her pick her toys off the floor or clean her mouth after eating. Teach your 8-year old son how to wash his socks and panties. Starting these lessons early helps the child get used to such and considers it a routine, as opposed to a punishment or inconvenience.

2) Draw up a schedule. Make a well detailed chore-schedule, which includes time and sanctions. Make sure you include every member of the family.

3) Be a good role model. When trying to instill the nature of cleanliness into your child(ren), you as a parent must also be clean. It is called leading by example. You should learn to arrange your things
well and maintain a healthy lifestyle so that the young ones can imitate you.

4) Try to make the chores fun. Play some music, discuss casual stuff, crack jokes and give little treats after the completion of the chores as reward for their cooperation (make sure this isn’t a bribe or an incentive for them to work)

5) Encourage them. Try to criticize and shout less because they’ll eventually get immune to those insults and become recalcitrant which will lead to other issues. So, watch your tongue. Harsh words mostly do more harm than good.

First Veritas has a series of Social Habits Books for Pre-Primary. Click on image to find out more

Cleanliness is a continuous process. Share some of your methodologies in the comment box below

LEARNING SHOULD BE FUN

As adults, we may have been conditioned to believe that education and a serious face are inseparable. After all, learning how to get serious is a key part of growing up; right? Or so we are told. Yet, it has been proven again and again that the more fun even adults have at something, the easier they are likely to find doing it and the better they are likely to become at it. If that applies to adults, perhaps we need to review how we teach children and young adults.

Learning can be fun. Learning should be fun. We need a paradigm change. That someone is having fun at something shouldn’t mean that they are not learning or that they are unserious about their studies or work. Many people went through school without any inkling that learning does not have to be drudgery and uninteresting. For most, schooling was painful and something that they couldn’t wait to get away from. But if we make learning fun, there is no reason why anyone should want to run away from it.

  • The teacher ought to have fun teaching. How effective can a teacher, trainer or instructor be if they do not enjoy what they do? Do we really want to entrust the training of our children to people who do not enjoy teaching them?
  • The pupils and students ought to have fun learning. When they find their studies and classrooms fun, we will hardly ever have to chase them around and be able to spend our energies to more productive tasks and experiences. They will read and learn of their own accord more than ever.
  • At every tier of the educational system should be an air of fun. From the policy makers to administrators, the idea of learning being fun should be imprinted from the very start or else it won’t work.

Usually, we reserve learning as fun (or is it fun as learning now) for nursery and pre-school children. We expect that after that, learning should be sober and serious. While there is some sense in which that is true, what happens usually is that we squeeze out all the fun from that point on. A grave mistake. Make leaning fun and watch as more knowledge goes round.

DO NOT STIFLE CURIOSITY

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“Curiosity killed the cat”, is an old saying. It is used to caution people who let curiosity get the better of them. Here in Nigeria, our society is not traditionally encouraging of people who get curious. People are encouraged to stay with the lakes and the rivers that they know and are used to. As for the things that are strange or appear to have no explanation, we label them “dark” or “evil”. The evil forest. The dark river. The general attitude towards these things is that of keeping off. Don’t be curios; keep off and stay safe.

Yet, curiosity is a great driving force in learning. Whether it s Isaac Newton, some other great inventor, or the everyday person who discovers some new phenomenon or brings new ideas about how to do things, we will find that curiosity is key. So, an apple fell off a tree. Why not pick it up, clean it, eat and go on with your life? But curiosity asked why. Why did this fall from the tree? Why do apples and indeed all fruit fall to the ground? And thus began a quest for knowledge that has resulted in a discovery that has become one of the foundations for physics.

The question, Why? It has siblings like How? When? Where? What? In multiple fields around the world, students, teachers and practitioners keep asking these questions. It is the way forward. Curiosity is key to learning and should be encouraged.

Why does this stream have two outlets, and how is it that one outlet brings out cool water and the other warm? Questions. What can be done with this phenomenon? More questions. While curiosity may have killed the cat in that old story, it is because of curiosity that human civilization makes progress. It is how we learn best. When we go hunting out information and solutions for ourselves because we need convincing and because we need answers, we are at our best in the learning curve.